We got to look inside the redeveloped concert hall which reopens with a capacity of 750 on Thursday with a concert for special guests – Watch the article video HERE!

Work on the £7.1m development of the Royal Northern College of Music’s main concert hall is complete, turning the 1970s hall into the most state of the art performance space in the city.

The hall is the first venue to be fully lit by LEDs from ceiling to floor, with stairs that can ripple and ‘perform a Mexican wave of lighting’.

Balconies, including a Royal Oglesby Balcony, have been added, held in place by 55 tonnes of steelwork that had to be brought in through one small door by integrated property services and project delivery specialist Styles&Wood.

The hall also features a new sound system, flooring, seating, air conditioning, heating, teaching spaces, dressing rooms and other back of house facilities, and now seats up to 730 people.

The public will get to see the concert hall for the first time tomorrow when British baritone Sir Thomas Allen visits to perform Schubert’s song cycle Winterreise, with the school’s founding Principal, Sir John Manduell in attendance as a guest of honour.

Opened in 1973 as a rehearsal and performance space for students at the RNCM, the concert hall has undergone only minor cosmetic changes over the past 40 years. According to the development’s architect, Ian Palmer of BDP, that is partly because of the challenging design of the solid brick conservatoire.

This article was took from the Manchester Evening News

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